Marc Hays

National Conference
Speaker

Marc Hays

Marc Hays Lead Curriculum Developer

Marc is one of those scary smart, yet humble people who quietly make Classical Conversations the world-class educational organization that it is. Marc and his wife, Jamie, live in Hartsville, Tennessee, northeast of Nashville. The couple have six children, five of them enrolled in CC programs, and the sixth married and graduated from Challenge IV. Marc and Jamie were recently rewarded with the most amazing grandson under the sun.

Marc is Lead Curriculum Developer for Classical Conversations MultiMedia (CCMM) Content Development Team. CCMM is Classical Conversations’ publishing company. He researches and writes curriculum and textbooks for the Debate and Reasoning Strands of CC’s Challenge programs. His family has been involved in CC for 11 years, and he has been employed by the company for six years, previously serving as a Challenge III/IV academic advisor and the academic director.

Marc is a graduate of the CiRCE Institute’s Teacher’s Apprenticeship as a certified master teacher. CiRCE, Consulting and Integrated Resources in Classical Education, is a leading provider of inspiration, information, and insight to classical educators as well as the publisher of The Lost Tools of Writing program, used in Challenges A, B and I.

Marc is the author of the Analogies for All of Us textbook and the winner of the Silver Medal Illumination Book Award for Analogies for All of Us. Marc loves the English language and learning more about how humans think and use words, sentences and paragraphs. He is fascinated by analogies, poetry, and the use of dialectic and rhetoric to communicate with one another.

Marc is a licensed land surveyor in Tennessee and is currently building an apartment for his daughter and her little family. In his spare time he enjoys good conversations with teenagers and their parents.

Marc will be speaking about the essentials of the English language and their inherent relationships with truth, goodness, and beauty.

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